Art For A Cause

Most people today do not take art seriously thinking that it is only done by people who have nothing better to do in life and have the luxury to waste time by indulging in interests and past times that aren’t globally relevant such as painting. Nobody takes a painter seriously. Well, most do but there are a few who understands the cultural (and economic) value of paintings to the world at large. If you look at our history closely, you’d learn (and realize) that paintings depict the state of the times. From ancient primitive life to today’s modern world, we learn a lot of things about life and the state of the planet from these paintings and other artworks. It can be any of those scribbles and not-at-all fancy cave paintings to the ones found in most museums and art galleries today, you can easily tell how people go about their day-to-day by simply looking at painted visuals of how the painters see the world around them.

If people aren’t just simply judgmental and learn to see how important the art is in shaping and preserving our history, maybe we’d be able to give it the attention and adoration it needs. We are not only seeing an artist’s talent at work here but through the materials and method used, the audience can have a better understanding of when and how the art was made. Some philanthropists see just how powerful the arts can be, which is why they support various art causes that can make a positive difference in the world.

A series of arts events and related activities in Troy this weekend will celebrate feminism and raise funds for Upper Hudson Planned Parenthood. Called Nasty Women of the North, it is sponsored by the Feminist Art Project of Upstate NY. All events are free and open to the public. The schedule:

Friday

5 to 9 p.m., Collar Works gallery, 621 River St.: Nasty Women of the North Exhibition + Art Auction. Featuring local and international artists overseen by Angel Bellaran, curator for the original Nasty Women show in New York City. Upper Hudson Planned Parenthood team will be on site, and 100 percent of the proceeds benefit the agency. All artwork is priced between $25 and $100. Also, “Feminist Love Letters,” a project developed by social engagement artist Melissa Sarris.

(Via: http://www.timesunion.com/entertainment/article/Nasty-arts-events-to-aid-Planned-Parenthood-12309634.php)

By going to these events you not only support the artists but get to appreciate just what real talent is all about. Some of the artists can even incorporate the message they want to convey to the people through the very art they make. Indeed, pictures really say a thousand words. Imagine having this much impact and influence on others just like more popular art pieces like the Mona Lisa, the Last Supper, etc.

Greywood Arts received both Creative Ireland funding and a Cork County Council Creative Communities grant. The result is a programme called Creative Killeagh: a series of open-access arts workshops, performances, and events starting at Halloween and culminating in next year’s May celebration.

Jessica was determined to use the funding for creative projects that will engage the entire community. How has the village responded to their presence so far? “There are a few families that come to everything we do,” Jessica says.

“Other people are just happy to see the house being taken care of and not falling into
disrepair. Overall, there’s an educational component that will take more time to establish. And a lot of that is about just getting people to cross the threshold.”

(Via: http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsfilmtv/using-the-arts-to-revive-old-traditions-in-east-cork-461868.html)

Sometimes, an artistic initiative can be used to unite a community. It can create some sort of a buzz that can get people excited and actually willing to spend their time and energy into artsy projects that not only entertain them but support a rather important cause that can have a big impact on everyone. Until today, the arts continue to define what our society is like and it can hopefully tell the future generations how we have been living all along and help them learn from our mistakes. The arts are enduring, for that we can be sure of as we see ancient artworks having a big impact on our lives today and most unlikely until the future generations.

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